PEOPLE

matt-king

Matt King

UTas

Professor Nerilie Abram, from the ANU Research School of Earth Sciences, photographed  Monday, 24 February 2020 (Lannon Harley/ANU).

Nerilie Abram

ANU

Alan Aitken

Alan Aitken

UWA

David Antoine

David Antoine

Curtin U

Nathan Bindoff

Nathan Bindoff

UTas

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Julia Blanchard

UTas

Philip Boyd

Philip Boyd

UTas

John Church

John Church

UNSW

Zanna Chase

Zanna Chase

UTas

Richard Coleman

Richard Coleman

UTas

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Rhodri Davies

ANU

Michael Elwood

Michael Ellwood

ANU

Matt England

Matt England

UNSW

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Bishakhdatta Gayen

U Melb

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Ian Goodwin

UNSW

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Jacqui Halpin

UTas

Dave

David Heslop

ANU

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Nicole Hill

UTas

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Mark Hindell

UTas

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Delphine Lannuzel

UTas

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Mary-Anne Lea

UTas

Vanessa Lucieer

Vanessa Lucieer

UTas

Elisa Mantelli

Elisa Mantelli

UTas

Andrew McMinn

Andrew McMinn

UTas

Laurie Menviel

Laurie Menviel

UNSW

Adele Morrison

Adele Morrison

ANU

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Max Nikurashin

UTas

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Taryn Noble

UTas

Helen Phillips

Helen Phillips

UTas

Anya Reading

Anya Reading

UTas

Eelco Rohling

Eelco Rohling

ANU

Kate Selway

Kate Selway

Uni SA

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Alex Sen Gupta

UNSW

Paul_Spence

Paul Spence

UTas

Peter Strutton

Pete Strutton

UTas

Paul Regoning

Paul Tregoning

ANU

Chris Watson

Chris Watson

UTas

Duanne White

Duanne White

U Canberra

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Jo Whittaker

UTas

Jan Zika

Jan Zika

UNSW

Shigeru Aoki

Shigeru Aoki

Hokkaido University

Michael Bentley

Michael Bentley

Durham Uni

Herve Claustre

Herve Claustre

CNRS - LOV

Xavier_Crosta

Xavier Crosta

University of Bordeaux

Scott Doney

Scott Doney

University of Virginia

Gael Durand

Gael Durand

CNRS - IGE

Pierre Dutrieux

Pierre Dutrieux

British Antarctic Survey

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Tamsin Edwards

Kings College

Helen Fricker

Helen Fricker

SIO - UCSD

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Ben Galton-Fenzi

AAD

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Sarah Gille

SIO - UCSD

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Karsten Gohl

Alfred Wegner Institue

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Stephen Griffies

NOAA

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Stewart Jamieson

Durham Uni

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Bernd Kulessa

Swansea University

Amaelle Landais

Amaelle Landais

CNRS - LSCE

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Naomi Levine

USC

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Adrian Luckman

Swansea University

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Rob Massom

AAD

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Clive McMahon

SIMS - IMOS

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Klaus Meiners

AAD

Terence O'Kane

Terence O'Kane

CSIRO

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Alexandra Post

Geoscience Australia

Jason Roberts

Jason Roberts

AAD

Jean-Baptiste Sallee

Jean-Baptiste Sallee

CNRS - LOCS

Won Sang

Won Sang Lee

KOPRI

Ted Scambos

Ted Scambos

University of Colorado

Chris Stokes

Chris Stokes

Durham Uni

Lynne Talley

Lynne Talley

SIO - SOCCOM

Andrew Thompson

Andy Thompson

Caltech

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David Thompson

Colorado State Uni

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John Toole

WHOI

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Michiel Van Den Broeke

Utrecht Uni

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Anna Wahlin

University of Gothenburg

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Darryn Waugh

Johns Hopkins University

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Pippa Whitehouse

Durham Uni

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Eric Wolff

University of Cambridge

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Yusuke Yokoyama

University of Tokyo

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Xuebin Zhang

CSIRO

Collaborators

Rupert Gladstone

Rupert Gladstone

University of Lapland

Anders Levermann im Gespräch

Anders Levermann

PIK

University of Tasmania, Glacier researcher Professor Matt King.
Wed 11th Feb 2015
picture by Peter Mathew
Matt King
Centre Director

E:  matt.king@utas.edu.au  


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Current ACEAS Activities:

As Centre Director of ACEAS, Matt will lead the delivery of the research programs, strategy, governance, and operations for the Centre.

Under Matt's direction ACEAS will take five strategic approaches by:

  • Undertaking world-class integrated research;
  • Maximising strong national and international partnerships;
  • Employing a diverse workforce;
  • Leveraging and creating national research infrastructure; and
  • Creating pathways to local, regional, and circumpolar impact.
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Jane Richards
Centre Project Officer

E:  jane.richardsl@utas.edu.au

 

Current ACEAS Activities:

Jane's roles as ACEAS Centre Project Officer include:

  • Coordination of day-to-day administration needs of ACEAS including finance, record management and human resources.
  • Project administration support to the Director and Chief Operating Officer
  • Project coordination support for ACEAS research staff and students
  • Centre liaison for internal and external stakeholders
  • Coordinate the preparation of formal reports on research delivery against Key Performance Indicators
  • Secretary to the Management Committee
Melissa Lyne
Melissa Lyne
Communications Officer

E: melissa.lyne@utas.edu.au

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Current ACEAS Activities:

Melissa is the Communications Officer at the Australian Centre for Excellence in Antarctic Science. She coordinates the Centre’s communication activities, which includes promoting new research to the media and other key audiences. 

Patti Virtue (3)
Patti Virtue
Antarctic Graduate Training Coordinator 

E: p.virtue@utas.edu.au

Current ACEAS Activities:

Patti is the graduate training coordinator at the Australian Centre for Excellence in Antarctic Science. Her role includes developing and overseeing the implementation of the centre's training for early career researchers in Antarctic Science, Policy, Governance and Law.

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Pratiksha Bhatt
Project Officer - University of New South Wales

E: pratiksha.bhatt@unsw.edu.au

 

Current ACEAS Activities:

Pratiksha manages the UNSW node of ACEAS. She supports the research staff and students with everyday administration and provides operational management for the centre.

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Tom Williams
Antarctic Palaeoceanographer

E:  tom.williams@utas.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

My current activities within ACEAS are twofold. Firstly, I am working on better understanding the response of the Southern Ocean and Antarctica to climatic changes during the early- to mid-Pliocene period. In particular, I am focused on the mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP), from ~ 3.3 to 3.0 million years ago. During the mPWP, atmospheric CO2 concentrations varied between approximately 280-450 ppm, and global temperatures were at times 2-4 degrees warmer than pre-industrial times. This makes the mPWP a fantastic geological analog to projected 21st-century warming. Worryingly, the global sea level during the mPWP at times reached up to 15 metres higher than the present, suggesting significant melting of Antarctica ice sheets. My work focuses on identifying periods of ice mass loss from regions of East Antarctica that have been identified as potentially at risk of current warming.

The second theme of my research is to better understand the cycling of neodymium – a rare earth element – within the sediments and ocean around East Antarctica. The ratio of neodymium isotopes within marine sediments is widely used as a tracer for past changes in ocean circulation. This is because within the modern ocean different water masses possess unique neodymium isotopic signatures. However, uncertainty remains in exactly how marine sediments acquire their neodymium isotopic signature. To address this, I am examining the neodymium isotope signature of relatively recently deposited sediments within different sedimentary environments around East Antarctica.

 

Katharina Hochmuth
Katharina Hochmuth
Research Associate Tectonics and Ice Sheets

E: Katharina.Hochmuth@utas.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

The sedimentation offshore the Australian East Antarctic margin has been strongly influenced by the dynamics of the East Antarctic ice sheet as well as the tectonic remnants of the opening of the Southern Ocean and the separation between Australia and Antarctica.

As part of ACEAS, Katharina will focus on the reconstruction of sedimentation behaviour from various ice streams through time, revealing regional changes in the ice sheet and erosional dynamics and closely collaborates with other geologists, and geophysicists as well as the modelling community within ACEAS and beyond.

As part of the Denman glacier voyage, we hope to collect new datasets in this so far completely unsurveyed part of the continental shelf to work towards a better understanding of this vulnerable part of the East Antarctic ice sheet.

Kieran Murphy
Kieran Murphy
Research Associate Marine Ecology 

E: Kieran.Murphy@utas.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

At ACEAS, I am focused on ecological processes and doing my best to bring together data and knowledge from other disciplines to improve ecological models. With ecological models, I am hoping to address key questions facing Southern Ocean ecosystems, primarily relating to the implications of climate change and fishing. I am developing size- and trait-based ecosystem modelling approaches for the Southern Ocean. I am attempting to integrate models with observational datasets collected across different spatial scales and spanning a vast range of taxonomic groups and trophic levels. These approaches will help us to understand how Southern Ocean ecosystems are responding to the rapid changes that are occurring.

I am very excited to be a part of the ACEAS research community. The truly multidisciplinary nature of ACEAS is an exciting proposition and contributing to the diverse research team is a privilege. Moreover, from my experience, multidisciplinary planning and transfer of knowledge leads to outcomes that are greater than the sum of the parts.

I aim to work closely with researchers collecting field-based data for important functional groups and distinct organisms in the Southern Ocean, to maximise the inclusion of data to improve model realism. This will hopefully include collaboration with researchers involved in data collection and production from satellites and Earth System Models, ARGO floats, all up to biological data collected from large marine mammals.

I am the co-coordinator of the ACEAS Working Group ‘Physics to Food Webs’. 'Physics to food webs' is an ACEAS (Australian Centre for Excellence in Antarctic Science) Working Group aiming to link researchers across disciplines to improve ecological modelling efforts for the Southern Ocean

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Rebecca McGirr
Research Associate Mass Balance (remote sensing, modelling)

E: Rebecca.mcgirr@anu.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

My role at ACEAS involves using space gravity data to measure the impacts of modern climate change on the mass of water stored as continental ice within the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. As part of ACEAS I will assess what spatial and temporal resolution of mass balance estimates can be achieved from current remote sensing data and how to best mitigate the impacts of glacial isostatic adjustment on mass balance estimates in polar regions. From these results, I will accurately estimate high spatio-temporal resolution changes in mass balance in East Antarctica and the associated contributions to global sea level over the past two decades

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David Green
Research Associate Marine Foraging Strategies

E: David.green@utas.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

My role at ACEAS focuses on improving understanding and representation of the linkages between Southern Ocean biophysics, mid-trophic level prey, and predators. In tackling this, my role has two separate but complementary themes.

The first theme uses in-situ observations, obtained through animal biotelemetry (satellite loggers with onboard CTD sensors), to concurrently measure biophysical ocean properties, relative prey abundances, and changes in predator foraging behaviour. With these combined datasets, I aim to derive empirical links spanning environment – prey – predators and use these to generate understanding around how Southern Ocean biota might respond to fine-scale changes in their environment.

The second theme focuses on formalising trophic linkages through mechanistic modelling. Here I consider approaches for representing key Southern Ocean energy pathways through extending current general circulation and biogeochemical models to represent mid-trophic levels. In doing this, I have been implementing a modified ecosystem model (SEAPODYM) framework to represent a key Southern Ocean prey species – Antarctic krill. Through this work, I hope to extend my research to applied questions addressing sustainable species management under a changing climate.

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Madelaine Rosevear
Research Associate Ice-ocean interactions

E: madi.gamblerosevear@unimelb.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

As an ACEAS Postdoc I will be investigating the ocean processes responsible for melting Antarctic ice shelves using a modelling approach. The ability to accurately predict basal melting of Antarctic ice shelves is critical to future projections of ice sheet stability and sea level. However, due to the difficulty of accessing the ocean beneath ice shelves, which are hundreds of meters thick and hundreds of kilometers long and wide, the ocean environment beneath ice shelves is rarely observed and the ocean processes that govern heat transport to the ice remain poorly understood. I will use a high-resolution ocean model to target processes that are expected to drive elevated heat transport to the ice, such as internal wave activity, and quantify their effect on ice shelf basal melting. In collaboration with other ACEAS investigators, I will use new and existing results from my PhD work to develop and implement a new parameterisation for basal melting for use in large-scale Ocean/Climate models, to improve the accuracy of future climate and sea-level projections.

Juan Li
Juan Li
Research Associate Satellite Remote Sensing 

E: juan.li@curtin.edu.au

 

Current ACEAS Activities:

I’m currently consolidating possible in situ data collected in the Southern Ocean, such as ACE, SOLACE and SOTS. Based on which, I will explore the bio-optical properties of the Southern Ocean to get an overview.

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Sandeep Mohapatra
Research Associate - Modes of Ocean Variability 

E: Sandeep.mohapatra@utas.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

I am working on the ocean modes of variability of the global ocean with a major focus on the Southern Ocean and its footprint on the atmospheres and over land including Antarctica by using reanalysis products and coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations.

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Emiliano Cimoli
Research Associate - Under Ice Mapping

E: Emiliano.cimoli@utas.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

Focusing on the Southern Ocean (SO) Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), my role will be to implement novel under-ice mapping techniques that can capture key sea-ice biophysical properties challenging to measure by any other means. The derived under-ice remote sensing products, to be linked with meaningful biogeochemical and ecological processes monitored by other ACEAS groups, aim to deliver datasets and tools cognisant of the temporal and spatial scales required by the ACEAS workforce and other partner organizations.

In particular, the technical component of the project involves designing means to deploy under-ice hyperspectral imaging and photogrammetric payloads that are mounted on Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs). Information on sea-ice sympagic communities (e.g., biomass and photophysiology) and structure will then be combined with surface products (e.g., from Unoccupied Aerial Systems (UASs) and other platforms) to deliver a multi-scale array of biophysical sea-ice data that can be assimilated with known information in the region.

Through the analysis of new and existing bio-optical under-ice data, the project ultimately envisions the delivery of new monitoring tools and algorithms that can provide support for modelling efforts and reveal complex biophysical processes under a changing Antarctic sea ice.

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Zhi Li
Research Associate Southern Ocean Processes 

E: zhi.li4@unsw.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

My current activities within ACEAS are to investigate Southern Ocean ventilation and water-mass formation, as well as the heat uptake and redistribution by Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in driving Southern Ocean warming. I have been looking at the formation and variability of SAMW and AAIW in the Southern Ocean, by reconciling their volume changes with formation mechanisms of subduction and water-mass transformation. I am currently working at investigating the ocean heat uptake and redistribution by SAMW and AAIW formation for understanding Southern Ocean warming, and more broadly, global warming.

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Gabriel M. Pontes
Research Associate - Palaeo Ocean Modelling 

E: g.pontes@unsw.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

At ACEAS, my goal is to understand how meltwater discharge events from the Greenland Ice Sheet affect the high latitude Southern Hemisphere Climate, in particular the Eastern Antarctic Ice Sheet. Freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic Ocean have the potential to greatly weaken, or even shut down, the main pathway by which the ocean transports heat poleward: the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Such change would have an impact in the global climate, cooling the Northern Hemisphere and affecting tropical rainfall patterns. Nonetheless, little is known about how AMOC weakening would affect the high latitude regions in the Southern Hemisphere. To accomplish this, I combine numerical experiments using climate models to evidence from past events in the Earth’s history as inferred from proxy data.

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Pauline Latour
Reserach Associate - Ocean-ice Biogeochemistry 

E: pauline.latour@utas.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

As an ACEAS postdoc, I will investigate the role of trace metals originating from the cryosphere in stimulating surrounding primary productivity. Using a combination of field- and lab-based experiments, I will look at the cycle of sea ice trace metals in East Antarctica and study the impact of their speciation and limitation on phytoplankton physiology.

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Tamara Schlosser
Research Associate - Marine Ecosystems Remote Sensing 

E: tamara.schlosser@utas.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

As part of ACEAS, I am investigating the environmental drivers that control the onset of the Southern Ocean spring bloom. I work with biogeochemical Argo (BGC-Argo) float data from the Southern Ocean, in combination with other data streams (satellite, model outputs, reanalysis products), and one-dimensional turbulence modelling. By understanding how the Southern Ocean primary productivity is dependent on the physical environment, we can better predict future ecosystem changes and the resulting biogeochemical fluxes.

Kaihe Yamazaki
Kaihe Yamazaki
Research Associate Physical Oceanography 

E: Kaihe.Yamazaki@utas.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

I will quantify the fine-scale structure of velocity and water mass properties across the Southern Ocean from existing observations to examine the processes that regulate heat, freshwater and other tracers across Southern Ocean fronts, with a particular emphasis on the East Antarctic margin. This work will include analysis of high-resolution model simulations (e.g. MITgcm and ACCESS-OM2-01) to test their ability to represent these processes. I will also participate in marine science voyage to the Denman Glacier.

Tobias Staal
Tobias Stål
Research Associate Computational Geophysics 

E: tobias.staal@utas.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

I study how Antarctica's response to the changing climate depends on solid Earth properties and processes. In my role at ACEAS, I investigate new ways to gain insight into how geology interacts with ice sheets and glaciers. Such insights are derived from geophysical and geological data using novel computational and statistical tools. Integrating data from satellites, airborne instruments, and seismology with qualitative observations in glaciology and geology provide technical as well as semantic challenges. Those challenges can be addressed with the broad expertise in ACEAS; multivariate questions call for interdisciplinary efforts.

I am based at the University of Tasmania School of Natural Sciences, Physics. In this environment, I have the opportunity to get inspired by colleagues using relevant and advanced analytical and computational tools to address similar problems in different settings.

Currently, I am working on instrumentation and field preparations to study the ice-bedrock interface as well as deeper structures. I am also developing new methods to study the large-scale tectonic configuration of the Antarctic interior and derive implications for subglacial heat and glacial isostatic adjustment.

Matthis-Auger
Matthis Auger
Research Associate Ocean Modelling

E: matthis.auger@utas.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

I am a postdoctoral research associate at UTAS working on Southern Ocean modelling with Dr. Paul Spence. A major part of my activities is to conceal ocean modelling and satellite altimetry observation to uncover physical processes in the subpolar Southern Ocean, such as Dense Water overflows or ocean-sea ice interactions.

I will also be involved in the development of regional Pan-Antarctic models and in-situ observations studies in the Southern Ocean.

Yuhao Dai
Yuhao Dai
Research Associate Marine Biogeochemistry 

E: yuhao.dai@anu.edu.au


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Current ACEAS Activities:

I am currently investigating the carbon cycle in the Southern Ocean during the Miocene, the last time the atmospheric CO2 level is comparable to the present. I will use stable isotopes and trace elements of microfossils to reconstruct Southern Ocean seawater chemistry in the past. Based on these reconstructions, I will try to understand the feedback between CO2 and the Southern Ocean phytoplankton productivity in a warm climate. I hope this work can provide insights into responses of the Earth’s climate to future atmospheric CO2. I will also investigate modern Polar Southern Ocean biogeochemistry using samples from upcoming Antarctic research voyages.